Zero State Response using Matlab

Response to a General Input In addition to computing and plotting the impulse and step responses of a system, MATLAB can be used to find and display the response to general functions of time. This is done with the lsim command, which can be used in a variety of ways. …

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Impulse Response using Matlab

Impulse Response using Matlab

How to Obtain an Impulse Response Once a transform (or transfer function) G(s) has been defined in MATLAB, operations can be performed to compute and display the corresponding time function g(t), known as the inverse Laplace transform. If the poles are known, G(s) can be written as a partial-fraction expansion …

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Transfer Function Calculation Matlab with Example

Transfer Function Example

Transfer Functions Representation Consider a fixed single-input/single-output linear system with input u(t) and output y(t) given by the differential equation $\begin{matrix}   \overset{..}{\mathop{y}}\,+6\overset{.}{\mathop{y}}\,+5y=4\overset{.}{\mathop{u}}\,+3u & \cdots  & (1)  \\\end{matrix}$ Applying the Laplace transform to both sides of (1) with zero initial conditions, we obtain the transfer function of the system from the …

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Difference between Core type and Shell type Transformer

Core type Transformer In core type transformers, winding is positioned on two limbs of the core and there is ONLY one flux path and windings are circumventing the core.     These transformers are quite favorite in High voltage practical applications like Distribution, Power, and Auto-Transformers. Shell Type Transformer In …

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Difference between Conductor Semiconductor and Insulator

This article covers the key differences between Conductor, Semiconductor, and Insulator on the basis of Conductivity, Resistivity, Forbidden Gap, Conduction, Band Structure, Current Flow, Band Overlap, 0 Kelvin Behavior, and Examples.The following table covers the key Differences between Conductor Semiconductor and Insulator. You May Also Read: Difference between Electric and Magnetic …

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Difference between Brushed and Brushless Motors

Brushless DC motors are the one which use an electronic commutation and are powered through a DC source using switching supply and an inverter, which basically generates an AC electrical signal for driving the motor in order to drive the motor. Performance is the main concern for such motors and …

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Difference between Capacitor and Battery

Capacitor and battery both perform the same function of storing and releasing an energy, however, there are essential differences between both of them due to how they function differently. Capacitors store energy in the form of an electric field while batteries store energy in the form of chemical energy. The …

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Linearity in Circuits

Consider the relationship between voltage and current for a resistor (Ohm’s Law). Suppose that c current I1 (the excitation or input) is applied to a resistor, R. then the resulting voltage V1 (the response or output) is \[{{V}_{1}}={{I}_{1}}R\] Similarly, if I2 is applied to R, then V2=I2R results. But if …

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Difference between AC Drives and DC Drives

The AC drives operate with AC signal or voltage, for instance, 1-phase or 3-phase AC voltages whereas DC drives operate with DC signal or voltage, for instance, DC supplies, and Batteries. Generally, a DC drive changes an Alternating Current (AC) into Direct Current (DC) using a converter (Rectifier) to operate …

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