Difference between Brushed and Brushless Motors

Brushless DC motors are the one which use an electronic commutation and are powered through a DC source using switching supply and an inverter, which basically generates an AC electrical signal for driving the motor in order to drive the motor. Performance is the main concern for such motors and …

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Difference between Capacitor and Battery

Capacitor and battery both perform the same function of storing and releasing an energy, however, there are essential differences between both of them due to how they function differently. Capacitors store energy in the form of an electric field while batteries store energy in the form of chemical energy. The …

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Linearity in Circuits

Consider the relationship between voltage and current for a resistor (Ohm’s Law). Suppose that c current I1 (the excitation or input) is applied to a resistor, R. then the resulting voltage V1 (the response or output) is \[{{V}_{1}}={{I}_{1}}R\] Similarly, if I2 is applied to R, then V2=I2R results. But if …

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Difference between AC Drives and DC Drives

The AC drives operate with AC signal or voltage, for instance, 1-phase or 3-phase AC voltages whereas DC drives operate with DC signal or voltage, for instance, DC supplies, and Batteries. Generally, a DC drive changes an Alternating Current (AC) into Direct Current (DC) using a converter (Rectifier) to operate …

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Difference between Analog and Digital Multimeter

A multimeter is a device which is used to measure several electrical quantities such as current, voltage, resistance, inductance, capacitance, and electrical frequency. The most significant difference between an analog multimeter and the digital multimeter is that the analog multimeter comprises of a scale and a deflection pointer which actually …

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Difference Between Active and Passive Components

Active Components Electrical Components which need an external source to initiate the operation are known as active components such as Silicon-Controlled Rectifier (SCR), Transistors, and Diodes. Example Since a Diode is an active element so it needs an external source (either voltage or current) in order to initiate the operation. …

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Difference between AC and DC Power

AC power alters its direction with time, while DC power remains constant. Furthermore, AC power oscillates at 60 Hz frequency whereas DC power has Zero frequency. The main advantage of an AC power over DC is that it can be transmitted over long distances at higher voltages using transformers with …

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Difference between AC and DC Motor

An electric motor is a machine that converts electric energy into mechanical energy. An electrical signal (voltage) is applied to the input terminals of the motor, and the output of the motor output generates a specific torque according to the motor characteristics. AC motors and DC motors perform the same …

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Difference between AC and DC Generator

The AC generator generates an output voltage which alters in amplitude as well as time whereas the DC generator generates a constant output voltage which does not change in amplitude as well as time. The electrical energy we utilize has two fundamental types, one is known as Alternating while the …

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Difference between AC and DC Current

Electrical current flows using two ways: either in a direct current or in an alternating current (AC). Electric current is basically the free movement of electrons by a conductor. The main difference between AC and DC is based upon the direction in which the flow of electrons occurs. DC Current …

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Difference between AC Servo Motor and DC Servo Motor

Power Source is the key difference between AC and DC Servo motors. AC servo motors depend on an AC power source whereas DC Servo motors depend on DC power source (like Batteries).  AC servo motors performance is dependent upon voltage as well as frequency whereas DC servo motors performance mainly …

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Difference between Single Phase and Three Phase Induction Motor 

The main difference between single phase induction motor and three phase induction motor is that single phase motors are NOT self-starting so they require some starting mechanism while three-phase motors are self-starting. Furthermore, single phase motor requires ONLY single phase supply so they produce an alternating magnetic field whereas three …

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